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Induction

Induction of labour is an obstetric procedure that is designed to pre-empt the natural process of labour by initiating its onset artificially before it occurs spontaneously. The decision to induce labour is usually taken to serve some interest, most usually that of the baby, less often that of the mother and sometimes that of the obstetrician and medical service. Few issues have generated as much controversy as this one, particularly in the days when the ability to induce labour seemed to outstrip sound clinical judgment. It is rare these days for labour induction to have to be considered with regard to

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What is Labour?

The definition of labour is the onset of regular contractions with dilatation of the cervix. At the bottom of the uterus you find the cervix, which also forms the top of the vagina. The cervix will go through major changes to enable your baby to pass through into the birth canal.  It will gradually get softer and thinner and will then start to dilate to prepare for the birth. The uterus is made up almost entirely of muscle, which will tense and relax during contractions. What Are Contractions? All women describe contractions differently. Some describe them as severe menstrual cramps, some have

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The Needs of a Premature Baby

What Does A Premature Baby Look Like? It depends on the gestational age that the baby is born at. Preemies lack subcutaneous body fat and are usually very small with their heads largely out of proportion to the rest of their body. Depending on their gestational age, they may not have a finger or toenails and their ears appear to be paper-thin. Their skin colour is reddish and transparent. Their eyes remain closed for the first few days. The more premature the baby, the more noticeable these characteristics. "Preemies look like little birds that fell out of their nest" How Do Preemies Behave? Each

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Your Babys Appearance

Now that the doctors have done all their checks and are happy, you get to meet your baby for the first time. The appearance of your baby may not be as you expected, clean and calm, however, this bundle of joy is yours and this is what you can really expect. Head Your baby’s head may be elongated or misshaped due to natural birth, this is caused because the skull bones slide and are not fused together yet, this is to allow for the virginal birth, there may be slight bruising or swelling due to the birth, however, there is nothing to

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Multiple Gestation

Length of Hospital Stay Complications Most of the risks to infants resulting from multiple gestation pregnancies are due to the increased likelihood of premature delivery. The more babies who result from a pregnancy, the greater the likelihood of premature delivery. The average length of multiple gestational pregnancy is as follows  Single baby: 40 weeks Twins: 36 weeks Triplets: 32 weeks Quadruplets: 28 weeks Each additional baby in the uterus shortens the pregnancy by about 4 weeks on average. The survival and outcomes of premature infants are improving year by year as a result of new developments in high-risk obstetrics and newborn intensive

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Twin To Twin Transfusion Syndrome

Why does Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome Happen? How often does Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome Happen? The Recipient Twin - The Larger Baby The Donor Twin - The Smaller Baby Description of Twin To Twin Transfusion Syndrome Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome (TTTS) is a disease of the placenta. It affects identical twins and higher order identical multiple pregnancies when blood passes disproportionately from one baby to the other through connecting blood vessels within their shared placenta. One baby, the recipient twin, gets too much blood overloading his or her cardiovascular system, and may die from heart failure. The other

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Rh Disease

How Can Woman Find Out If She Is Rh-negative? How Can Rh Disease Be Prevented? How Does RhIg Work? Does RhIg Treatment Always Work? Is There Any Way To Get Rid of the Mother's Antibodies? How Is Rh Disease Treated Before Birth? What Happens If Both a Mother and Her Fetus Are Rh-negative? Can the RhIg Treatment Transmit the AIDS Virus? Description of RH Disease Rh disease of the newborn is caused by an incompatibility between the blood of a mother and her fetus. It is a hemolytic disease — that is, it causes destruction of fetal red blood cells. In

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Premature Rupture of Membranes

Impact on Pregnancy Special Prenatal / Birth / Neonatal considerations Description of PROM Premature rupture of the membranes occurs when the bag of water breaks before laboru starts. The bag of water is like a water balloon that surrounds the baby. The membranes are like the rubber of the balloon. PROM occurs in 1 out of ten pregnancies after 37 weeks. Preterm premature rupture of the membranes is before 37 weeks (PPROM). This can lead to premature delivery. Uncontrolled leaking of fluid from the vagina is the main sign. The amount may be a lot, soaking clothing and bedding, or a little. Sometimes

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Preterm Labour

Special Considerations How can I take care of myself? What can be done to help prevent placenta previa? Description of Preterm Labour Labour that begins prior to 37 weeks is defined as preterm labour. There must be both painful and regular contractions, and a change in the cervix. Contractions that occur prior to 37 weeks BUT do not change the cervix are called preterm contractions. Preterm contractions do not usually need to be treated unless the woman is very preterm and the contractions are very frequent and strong. Signs of preterm labor are Regular cramping-like menses or intermittent back aches. Increase in discharge

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Placenta Previa

How does it occur? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? How is it treated? Description of Placenta Previa Placenta previa is a condition in pregnancy in which the placenta lies below the baby in the uterus and may completely block the opening to the uterus (cervix). The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and allows oxygen, nourishment, and wastes to pass between the mother and the baby. Most low-lying placentas seen in the first 3 months of pregnancy will go away because as the uterus grows, the placenta moves away from the opening of the uterus.

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